How do we compare UK internet speed with the rest of World?

With ever changing faster speeds on the internet. Readitontheweb looks at who has the fastest, reliable internet speeds around the world.

Rank/Country/Download Mbps

1-Singapore156.25

2 Hong Kong140.83

3-South Korea126.72

4-Iceland125.33

5-Romania94.32

6-Macau80.83

7+1Sweden76.02

8-1Switzerland73.89

9-United States72.71

10 Japan70.12

25-1United Kingdom48.81

http://www.speedtest.net/global-index

Uk coming in at 25 has no doubt that the Broadband companies and the Governments initiative to improve speeds has really worked or kicked into practice?

To download a movie in the UK:10minutes, compared with the speed that of Singapore 3 times as long of 3 minutes.

Test your Broadband speed:https://www.uswitch.com/broadband/speedtest/

Eight in 10 (83%) UK broadband users have experienced reliability issues over the past year, according to new research by price comparison and switching service uSwitch.com.

Customers’ biggest broadband bugbear is slow loading pages, which 71% of those surveyed have been blighted by in their current contract. Six in 10 (63%) have experienced buffering, more than half (54%) have had pages crash and 67% say their internet disconnects.

Despite superfast broadband significantly reducing speed and reliability issues compared to standard packages, only 57% of users believe they can access superfast speeds in their area[4] and nearly a third (30%) don’t know if they can access such services at all. In reality, superfast broadband is now available to 90% of households.

uSwitch.com’s research suggests that consumers are bamboozled by the terminology used by broadband providers too. While 94%[6] say they understand that ‘fibre broadband’ is ‘faster than standard’, a quarter(26%) admit they don’t know what types of service will deliver superfast speeds to their home.

One in five (19%) broadband users say they’d switch providers for faster speeds and more than a third (38%) would switch for a cheaper deal.

uSwitch.com is calling on the industry to improve transparency around broadband speeds so users understand what they can actually get in their own home.

Ewan Taylor-Gibson, broadband expert at uSwitch.com, says: “Broadband has long been a household essential but consumers are saying they’re still facing reliability issues”.

While not a magic bullet, superfast broadband sometimes referred to as fibre or by a branded name – can significantly reduce speed and reliability issues. As it stands though, only 57% of consumers believe they can access superfast services in their area when in reality, 90% of premises should be able to access these speeds.

Most consumers aren’t bothered by the technical definitions of their broadband connection, they just want and deserve a reliable service that delivers value. However, consumer speed frustrations coupled with a lack of awareness around superfast availability shows more needs to be done to communicate what’s available to individual properties in a meaningful way. Customers can’t ‘try superfast before they buy’, the next best solution is for the industry to improve transparency around speeds, showing what’s available from providers side by side, in a personalised way. Consumers can currently do a postcode search to see if superfast is available to their property but actual speeds for the property need to be put in context. The industry needs to find ways to allow quick and easy comparison of the current and potential speeds available to the property, by provider, in order to evaluate and select the service that offers best value.The Government’s target of superfast being available to 95% of premises by the end of this year looms large. While continued investment in the UK’s broadband infrastructure is critical, we must make sure we don’t fall behind due to lack of uptake.

Readitontheweb, will be doing its own research/reviews on the quality of Broadband providers in the UK.

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